Homage or Homogeneity?

 

A black-and-white issue for some,  there is no crime in either. To put it any other way is like calling for red wine over white, rare steak over medium, French bread over sourdough.

Not everyone can tolerate the strong taste of black coffee. In fact, just 40% of coffee consumed is black (industry research). Most prefer coffee with a milder and sweeter palate. Cream or sugar accomplishes this.

There are coffee shops that will point out certain coffees "stand up to cream" and others are "meant" to drink black. Translated: Single-origin coffees are nuanced to subtle degrees. But even single-origin brew can handle one quarter- to half-teaspoon of sugar and a half-teaspoon of cream without losing that "blueberry apple-orchid pie with lemon icing and jasmine tea" as some descriptions would have you believing.

Cream will mute acidity, there's no question. In very small amounts, you can hold certain notes in your cup. A scant amount of raw sugar can slightly amplify flavor — too much can mutate it.

Apart from the chemistry of coffee is personal preference. The nice thing about science is that it's true, whether or not you agree with it.

Homage or Homo-geneity?

A black-and-white issue for some,  there is no crime in either. To put it any other way is like calling for red wine over white, rare steak over medium, French bread over sourdough.

Not everyone can tolerate the strong taste of black coffee. In fact, just 40% of coffee consumed is black (industry research). Most prefer coffee with a milder and sweeter palate. Cream or sugar accomplishes this.

There are coffee shops that will point out certain coffees "stand up to cream" and others are "meant" to drink black. Translated: Single-origin coffees are nuanced to subtle degrees. But even single-origin brew can handle one quarter- to half-teaspoon of sugar and a half-teaspoon of cream without losing that "blueberry apple-orchid pie with lemon icing and jasmine tea" as some descriptions would have you believing.

Cream will mute acidity, there's no question. In very small amounts, you can hold certain notes in your cup. A scant amount of raw sugar can slightly amplify flavor — too much can mutate it.

Apart from the chemistry of coffee is personal preference. The nice thing about science is that it's true, whether or not you agree with it.

Homage or Homogeneity?

 

A black-and-white issue for some,  there is no crime in either. To put it any other way is like calling for red wine over white, rare steak over medium, French bread over sourdough.

Not everyone can tolerate the strong taste of black coffee. In fact, just 40% of coffee consumed is black (industry research). Most prefer coffee with a milder and sweeter palate. Cream or sugar accomplishes this.

There are coffee shops that will point out certain coffees "stand up to cream" and others are "meant" to drink black. Translated: Single-origin coffees are nuanced to subtle degrees. But even single-origin brew can handle one quarter- to half-teaspoon of sugar and a half-teaspoon of cream without losing that "blueberry apple-orchid pie with lemon icing and jasmine tea" as some descriptions would have you believing.

Cream will mute acidity, there's no question. In very small amounts, you can hold certain notes in your cup. A scant amount of raw sugar can slightly amplify flavor — too much can mutate it.

Apart from the chemistry of coffee is personal preference. The nice thing about science is that it's true, whether or not you agree with it.